Bittersweet memories of travelling to Turkey by Amara Z.

Being quite wanderlust myself, I was just going through various vacation spots from around the world for my next trip when I found myself on this website. As I started scrolling down, I could not believe the brilliance of this website. Serving as a platform that automatically connects you with all bi-lingual locals that match […]

Being quite wanderlust myself, I was just going through various vacation spots from around the world for my next trip when I found myself on this website. As I started scrolling down, I could not believe the brilliance of this website. Serving as a platform that automatically connects you with all bi-lingual locals that match your language of the country you’re planning to visit, this website, although refreshed my bittersweet memories of travelling to Turkey for the first time ever, also provided me with the hope of never having to embarrass myself in front of an entire bazar just because I couldn’t understand the vendor’s language!

Turkey Istanbul Language barriers

My Trip to Turkey

The thought of visiting Turkey entered my mind a few years back owing to my friend’s amazing Instagram feed. He had recently gotten hitched and instead of going to places like Italy or France, he decided to take his wife to explore the likes of this beautiful city instead. This sparked up my long-forgotten love for Turkey and I immediately booked a flight to this gorgeous most city of Asia. Thus, I landed in Turkey a few hours later with an overly packed bag of clothes and a nonexistent knowledge about this city whatsoever.

However, my immediate worry after arriving there was finding a good hotel, let alone fretting over my luggage or inability of speaking the Turkish language. Little did I know of course, that all of these were inter linked. At first, none of the taxi drivers in Turkey knew English so I had to talk to them via the hand gesturing for the most part of it. Then, I knew absolutely nothing about the roads or places or traffic even making me find a decent hotel highly tiresome. My first day in Turkey hadn’t even ended yet and already I had become homesick.

The days that followed were no less exhausting for me, since I was feeling extremely alienated in this beautiful yet confounding country. My google maps weren’t helping me as well for in order to actually get to a place you should be able to know how to say it and as for me, I couldn’t even pronounce it. One time for instance, I kept asking a man the location of this place my friend suggested me and he started blaring at me in Turkish. Baffled, I stood there asking him again as his exasperation with me started elevated. Thirty minutes we stood there, babbling to each other in completely foreign languages and quite honestly making a big scene out of us that a couple of Englishmen walked past me saying, “Quit making a fool out of him by mispronouncing Turkish! These Turks really get offended by this!” Apologizing I cleared out from there thanking god to have survived his forthcoming beating just in time!

Therefore, big thumbs up to pronatives for providing people with the opportunity of travelling and exploring every single city without having to make a fool out of themselves on the grounds of language barriers.

Amara Z. from Pakistan

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